Imaging Services

What we see saves lives.

At Quantum Radiology, we see our patients in a unique way. Our cutting-edge, subspecialized radiology services open the window to reveal causes of disease and pain. Quantum’s diagnostic insight is vital to our patients’ complete cycle of care.

MRI – Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Overview

MRI MachineMagnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a type of imaging that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to generate images of the body. MRI has become a very valuable diagnostic tool detecting everything from cancer, heart and vascular disease, strokes, and disorders of the joints and musculoskeletal system. Of equal significance is the ability for physicians to avoid unnecessary surgery and more invasive diagnostic procedures. MRI technology produces extremely detailed images of body tissue, organs and bones without the need for radiation. Electromagnetic energy is released when exposing a patient to radio waves in a strong magnetic field which is then measured and analyzed by a computer producing two and three dimensional images. The MRI scanner creates a strong magnetic field through the body, and then it sends radio waves into the body and assesses the response sent back from the different tissues. Under the influence of the magnetic field, different tissues send back different responses to the radio waves. Also, certain diseased or injured tissues send responses that are different from healthy ones. A computer in the scanner processes the different responses, and where they came from, into images of the body. These are displayed as slices, like slices through an orange or a loaf of bread. The images are sent to the radiologist for interpretation.

Preparation for Exam
As part of the preparation for the exam, you will be asked if you have any items that can cause some restrictions when having an MRI. These can be metal implants such as pain pumps, metal clips surgically implanted to control aneurysm bleeding, pacemakers to control your heart beat, or cochlear implants for your hearing. If you have any of these items please inform the MR scheduling staff when you make the appointment. When you arrive at the imaging center you will again be asked if you have these implants.

We will also need to know if you are pregnant. Although it is safe to scan patients that are pregnant, it is important that we know so we may inform you of the latest literature.

Exam Time
The length of the exam varies, but most exams can be completed in 30 minutes. If you have multiple exams, each exam takes approximately 30 minutes.

Exam Results
After your exam, the radiologist will review your images and a report will be sent directly to your physician. Reports are available within 24 to 72 hours.

CT – Computed Tomography

Overview

Datta WellStarComputed Tomography commonly referred to as a CT Scan is a noninvasive medical test that combines special x-ray equipment with sophisticated computers to produce multiple images or pictures of the inside of your body. A CT scan can provide greater clarity and reveal more details than regular x-ray exams. A CT scan can be used to study all parts of your body, such as the chest, abdomen, pelvis, or an arm or leg. It can take pictures of body organs, such as the liver, pancreas, intestines, kidneys, bladder, adrenal glands, sinuses, lungs, and heart. It also can study blood vessels, bones, spinal cord and brain.

These cross-sectional images of the area being studied can then be examined on a computer monitor or printed. These images can be manipulated into different positions, allowing the radiologist to thoroughly examine any area of interest.

The technologist begins by positioning you on the CT examination table, usually lying flat on your back or possibly on your side or on your stomach. If contrast material is used it will be injected through an intravenous line (IV). Next, the table will move quickly through the scanner to determine the correct starting position for the scans. Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed

Preparation for Exam
A CT scan varies for each examination. Depending on the area to be examined, preparations vary. Preparation instructions will be provided to you when your appointment is scheduled. If you are or think you might be pregnant, please inform our technologist before your procedure.

Exam Time
The CT scan usually takes 15 to 30 minutes.

Exam Results
After your exam, the radiologist will review your images and a report will be sent directly to your physician. Reports are available within 24 to 72 hours

Mammography

Overview

MammographyThe best way to find breast cancer early is with a mammogram. If you are a woman age 40 years or older, be sure to have a screening mammogram every one to two years.

Getting a mammogram is one of the best things a woman can do to protect her health. This simple test can find breast cancers early, when they’re smaller, easier to treat, and chances of survival are higher.

If you’re 40 or older, you should get a mammogram every year. Don’t wait. Call 678.581.5900 to schedule a mammogram today at one of our convenient locations.

American Cancer Society (ACS) recommendations for early breast cancer detection

The ACS recommends the following guidelines for finding breast cancer early in women without symptoms:

Mammogram: Women age 40 and older should have a screening mammogram every year and should keep on doing so for as long as they are in good health. While mammograms can miss some cancers, they are still a very good way to find breast cancer.

Clinical breast exam: Women in their 20s and 30s should have a clinical breast exam (CBE) as part of a regular exam by a health expert, at least every 3 years. After age 40, women should have a breast exam by a health expert every year. It might be a good idea to have the CBE shortly before the mammogram. You can use the exam to learn what your own breasts look and feel like.

Breast self-exam (BSE): BSE is an option for women starting in their 20s. Women should be told about the benefits and limitations of BSE. Women should report any changes in how their breasts look or feel to a health expert right away.

Research has shown that BSE plays a small role in finding breast cancer compared with finding a breast lump by chance or simply being aware of what is normal for each woman. If you decide to do BSE, you should have your doctor or nurse check your method to make sure you are doing it right. If you do BSE on a regular basis, you get to know how your breasts normally look and feel. Then you can more easily notice changes. But it’s OK not to do BSE or not to do it on a fixed schedule.

The goal, with or without BSE, is to see a doctor right away if you notice any of these changes: a lump or swelling, skin irritation or dimpling, nipple pain or the nipple turning inward, redness or scaliness of the nipple or breast skin, or a discharge other than breast milk. But remember that most of the time these breast changes are not cancer.

Women at high risk: Women with a higher risk of breast cancer should talk with their doctor about the best screening plan for them. This might mean starting mammograms when they are younger, having extra screening tests (such as an MRI), or having exams more often.

General Diagnostic Radiology

Overview

An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging.

A bone x-ray makes images of any bone in the body, including the hand, wrist, arm, foot, ankle, knee, leg or spine.

The chest x-ray is the most commonly performed diagnostic x-ray examination. A chest x-ray makes images of the heart, lungs, airways, blood vessels and the bones of the spine and chest.

Lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract radiography, also called a lower GI or barium enema, is an x-ray examination of the large intestine, also known as the colon. This includes the right or ascending colon, the transverse colon, the left or descending colon, sigmoid colon and the rectum. The appendix and a portion of the distal small intestine may also be included.

Preparation for Exam
Preparation is minimal and varies depending on the body area to be examined. Preparation instructions will be given when the exam is scheduled. If you are pregnant please inform the staff as soon as possible.

Exam Time
Exams vary in length but usually do not exceed 30 minutes.

Exam Results
After your exam, the radiologist will review your images and a report will be sent directly to your physician. Reports are available within 24 to 72 hours.

Nuclear Medicine/PET/CT

Overview

PET or Positron Emission Tomography is a nuclear medicine examination. The procedure is simple; an injection of a short lived radioactive tracer is given, similar to a blood test. This material is usually a form of sugar. After about an hour of quiet waiting to allow the material to become concentrated in the tissues, a CT scan is performed followed by the PET scan. The PET scan is then viewed in conjunction with the CT scan. The uptake of this material allows the Radiologist to determine how your cells are functioning and how quickly they are reproducing.

PET can be used to evaluate Oncology treatments for cancer. PET can evaluate the response to treatment and is useful in evaluating most malignancies. PET can also evaluate your heart muscle after a heart attack. The radiologist can also evaluate your brain; it has proven very useful in Alzheimer’s disease and seizure disorders.

Preparation for Exam
Each exam requires a specific preparation and this preparation is quite critical. It is important to follow the instructions given by our staff when scheduling the appointment for the best test results.

Exam Time
Usually the exam is about an hour and a half to two hours. After the injection you wait quietly for 60 minutes. There is then an additional 30-60 minutes for the actual scan to be performed.

Exam Results
After your exam, the radiologist will review your images and a report will be sent directly to your physician. Reports are available within 24 to 72 hours.